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Be Wary What You Research: You Might Get Sued

01/10/2017

by Craig M. Klugman, Ph.D.

Peter Cohen, Clayton Bloszies, Caleb Yee and Roy Gerona published an article in the journal Drug Testing and Analysis in April 2015 explaining the results of their testing of supplements. The researchers found that a compound, BPMEA, appeared in nearly half the supplement brands they examined and since neither the FDA (supplements are not currently under the purview of the FDA because they are not food products nor are they medications) nor the European Drug Agency has found BPMEA safe for human consumption, no one should purchase these supplements.…

Btn Rss Bioethics News.

01/20/2017
How Science Is Helping Us Understand Gender National Geographic

A “neutral space” is a hard thing for a teenager to carve out: Biology has a habit of declaring itself eventually. Sometimes, though, biology can be put on hold for a while with puberty-blocking drugs that can buy time for gender-questioning children.

01/20/2017
New Common Rule on the Federal Policy for the Protection of Human Subjects Federal Register

The departments and agencies listed in this document announce revisions to modernize, strengthen, and make more effective the Federal Policy for the Protection of Human Subjects that was originally promulgated as a Common Rule in 1991. This final rule is intended to better protect human subjects involved in research, while facilitating valuable research and reducing burden, delay, and ambiguity for investigators.

01/19/2017
Pharmacological rescue of diabetic skeletal stem cell niches Science

Stem cells: The key to boosting bone healing in diabetes

01/18/2017
Rewriting The Code of Life The New Yorker

Until crispr came along, biologists lacked the tools to force specific genetic changes across an entire population. But the system, which is essentially a molecular scalpel, makes it possible to alter or delete any sequence in a genome of billions of nucleotides. By placing it in an organism’s DNA, scientists can insure that the new gene will copy itself in every successive generation.